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Title:     A diamond in the rough: JM Huber and the PATH Business
Authors:     Ward, J. L., Zsolnay, C. A., & Waikar, S. V.
Date:     2017
Detail:     Abstract: In Late 2011, Jerry Bertram, Vice President And General Manager Of The Fire Retardant Additives Business Of Huber Engineered Materials (HEM), A Division Of Family-owned J. M. Huber Corporation, Was Preparing To Present The Potential Acquisition Of The Precipitated Alumina Trihydrate (PATH) Business To The Environment, Health, And Safety Committee Of Huber's Corporate Board. He Had Convinced HEM's Leadership Of PATH's Strategic Value To Their Business And The Urgency Of The Acquisition Based On PATH's Parent Company's Movement Into Chapter 11 Bankruptcy And Its Plans To Close The PATH Plant.

Winning Board Approval Posed A Major Challenge. It Was Unclear Whether The Plant Would Remain Operational, Because HEM Would Have To Enter A Shared-services Arrangement With PATH's Parent Company, Which Continued To Use The Site. In Addition, Acquiring PATH Would Mean Integrating Its Specialized, Unionized Labor Force Into Huber, Which Had Very Few Union Workers. Finally, Early Due Diligence Had Revealed Tens Of Millions Of Dollars Of Potential Environmental Risk On The Site. The Last Issue Was Particularly Critical, Given Huber's Generations-long History Of Respect For The Environment, And Its Executives' And Directors' Reluctance To Take On Any Business With Excessive Environmental Risk.

This Case Illustrates In Depth The Family Business Values That Can Promote Consideration Of An Ostensibly Unconventional And Risky Strategic Move, And Enable Executives To Push For Approval Of The Same, As Backed By Comprehensive Risk Assessment And Mitigation Plans.

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Title:     ATF, Inc.: Fasteners and family
Authors:     Ward, J. L., Stern, B. C., Zsolany, C. A., & Waikar, S. V.
Date:     2016
Detail:     Abstract: ATF Case Is A Succinct Opportunity To Explore The Many Special Features Of Leadership Succession For A Family Business. In 2009 The Company Was Passing The Baton To The Oldest Of Three Sons In The Second-generation Family Business. TF Produced Metal And Plastic Fasteners For, Primarily, The Automotive Industry. ATF Had Grown Into A Company With More Than $50 Million In Annual Revenues. The Company Had Grown In Large Part Through Alliances With Other Family Businesses Around The World. First-generation Patriarch Don Surber Had Led The Company Since He Acquired It In 1982. Don Was Known For His Charismatic Leadership Style And His Focus On Driving Value Through A Network Approach.
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Title:     Big boots to fill - The next generation continuing differently.
Authors:     Clinton, E., Craig, J. B., Diaz-Moriana, V., & Faherty C. M.
Date:     2016
Detail:     Abstract: This Case History Describes The Challenge Facing Carlos Garcia, The Third-generation Successor Of A Spanish Family Business, As He Takes Over The Reins Of Hispalis And Prepares To Continue The Business 'differently'. In Two Generations, Hispalis Has Morphed Into A Global Conglomerate, With A Portfolio Of Business Ventures In Multiple Industries And Countries. The Case History Facilitates Discussion Of Business And Family Issues And Is Appropriate For Beginning-level Undergraduate Students In The Areas Of Entrepreneurial Leadership, Family Business, Strategic Management And Corporate Governance.

Clinton, E., Craig, J. B., Diaz-Moriana, V., & Faherty, C. M. (2016). Big Boots To Fill-the Next Generation Continuing Differently [Case Study]. The International Journal Of Entrepreneurship And Innovation, 17(2), 133-139. Doi:10.1177/1465750316648581

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Title:     How to motivate the fifth generation? Balancing engagement and entitlement at Lee Kum Kee.
Authors:     Ward, J. L., Zsolnay, C. A., & Waikar, S. V.
Date:     2016
Detail:     Abstract: In Mid-2013, The Lee Family, Which Owned The Hong Kong-based Food And Health Product Giant Lee Kum Kee (LKK), Struggled With How Best To Increase Involvement Of The Fifth Generation (G5), The Children Of The Company's Current Fourth-generation (G4) Senior Executives And Governance Leaders. Only Two Of The Fourteen G5 Members Had Joined The Company, And Few Had Expressed Interest In Further Involvement, Including In The Multiple Learning And Development Programs The Business Offered, Such As A Mentoring Program. Many Of The G5 Cousins Had Expressed Little Interest In Business Careers In General, And None Of Them Currently Was Serving As An LKK Intern. G4 Members Observed That Their Children Were Busy With Family Obligations, Hobbies, And Emerging Careers Outside The Business. G5's Lack Of Interest In Business And Governance Roles Was Part Of A Growing Pattern Of Low Family Engagement In General, Exhibited By The Cancellation Of Recent Family Retreats (once An Annual Tradition) Because Of Apathy And Some Underlying Conflict. A History Of Splits Among Past Generations Of The Lee Family Regarding Business Leadership Made The Engagement Issue Even More Meaningful And Critical. Students Will Consider The Challenge From The Point Of View Of G4 Family Members David Lee, Chairman Of The Family's Family Office, And His Sister, Elizabeth Mok, Who Ran The Family Learning And Development Center. They And Their Three Siblings Saw Engaging The Next Generation As A Top Priority, One Related To Key Concepts Including Family-business Continuity, Generational Engagement And Empowerment, Succession, Emotional Ownership, And Intrinsic/extrinsic Motivation.
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Title:     Plymouth Tube Company: How to build ownership consensus
Authors:     Ward, J. L., & Zsolnay, C. A.
Date:     2016
Detail:     Abstract: Plymouth Tube, A Family Business, Was A Manufacturer Of Precision Tubing And Extruded Shapes For Aerospace, Desalination, Medical, Mining, Energy, And Water Industries Globally. Founded In 1924, As Of 2012 It Employed 770 People At Thirteen Plants In Seven U.S. States And Had Sales Of About $240 Million. The Family Had Twenty Members Across Three Generations, Including Spouses. The Board Was Composed Of Eight Members, Three From The Family And Five Who Were Independent. Stacy, Age 30, Was The Only Fifth-generation Family Member Working For The Company. Her Father, Van, Age 64 And A Fourth-generation Member, Had Been In The Business For Forty Years And Had Succeeded His Father As President, CEO, And Chairman.

In Early 2013, Management Presented A Very Large Expansion Project That Was Riskier Than Previous Recent Investments To The Board, And Requested The Board's Approval. Independent Board Members Asked Van To Obtain Feedback From The Family About The Proposal. Van Asked Stacy To Direct The Process For Informing The Family, Asking For Their Input, And Communicating It Back To The Board. How Should Stacy Conduct The Process? What Should Be Done With The Information Once It Has Been Gathered? Should Family Members Be Involved In This Type Of Business Decision? Based On The Information Given In The Case, Is This A Good Investment?

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Title:     Glennon Brothers: Old Dogs Need To Learn New Tricks.
Authors:     Clinton, E., Craig, J. B., Diaz-Moriana, V., & Faherty, C. M.
Date:     2015
Detail:     Abstract: This Case Study Presents The Story Of Glennon Brothers, A Third-generation Family-owned Sawmilling Business In Ireland. As The Firm Evolved Through The Organizational Life Cycle And The Complexity Of Firm Operations Increased, A Different Style Of Management Was Required To Navigate The Family Business To The Next Stage. The Brothers Needed To Move From Being Managers To Managing Managers. This Case Study Highlights How Coleaders Can Become Comfortable With Each Other And Unintentionally Overlook The Need To Change Their Managerial Priorities In Line With The Business's Evolution.

Citation: Clinton, E., V. Diaz, C. Faherty And Justin B. Craig. Glennon Brothers: Teaching Old Dogs New Tricks. Entrepreneurship Theory & Practice.

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